Cost of living in Melbourne Australia
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Cost of Living in Melbourne Australia
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cost of living in Melbourne
Here is a quick guide of the cost of living in Melbourne:

Rent:                                    A$100-750 Weekly rate (share accommodation is
cheaper)
More on Cost of Rent here.
Haircut: female                  A$20.00-100.00 (Women in Australia pays more for
haircut!)
Movie ticket                         A$13.00-15.00 (student discount might apply)                   
Restaurant/café meal      A$8.00-25.00
Medical:                               A$30 per consultation
Bus                                      A$15 (special discount for students)
Books:                                 A$50-200 depending on the book
Gas and Electricity:          A$100 if you live in a house
Taxi:                                    5 Minutes ride could cost A$5-10
Buy car:                               A$5000-50,000

Cost of Buying Furnisher in Melbourne.

Cost of Renting Home furnisher and appliances in Melbourne

The cost of study in Melbourne can be found here.  



The typical weekly grocery bill in Melbourne costs $263.67 while in Sydney it costs
$264.59.  The study in 2010 by the Bureau of Statistics, based on 46 items such as
meat, dairy, fruit and vegetables, packaged goods and toiletries, shows Melbourne
households have the cheapest groceries of the eight capital cities.  In Melbourne
shoppers paid $1.73 a kg more at the checkout for roast beef, taking the average
price to $12.43.  A 2kg bag of sugar cost $2.89, a jump of 50c, while margarine
rose 15c to $3.30.  The figures are a statistical average for Melbourne in the first
three months of 2010 compared with the same time last year.  Other price rises
include 1kg of chicken, up 28c to $5.94; a 210g can of pink salmon up 65c to $3.13,
a 600ml bottle of tomato sauce rose 12c to $2.08 and a 500g bag of frozen peas
increased by 14c to $2.24.  A 400g can of pet food cost 19c more at $1.38 and a
box of 170 tissues jumped 18c to $2.35. But shoppers paid less for rump steak,
down $1.28/kg to $19.09 and a 1kg leg of lamb was 12c cheaper at $10.03.  A
500g packet of sliced cheese fell by 38c to $5.54 and an eight-pack of toilet paper
was 32c cheaper at $6.65.  Fruit and vegetables fell across the board with oranges
down 65c/kg, bananas down 56c, onions 40c cheaper and carrots 24c cheaper.  
Shoppers also paid less for tea bags, coffee, dishwashing detergent and soap.  
While households have faced a big rise in the cost of electricity, water and
sewerage, child care, petrol and medical services in the past 12 months, the
overall basket of groceries has remained manageable. Prices vary between
stores, can be affected by sales and depend on the types of products and
quantities purchased.  Detailed Grocery cost in Melbourne can be found here at
Woolworth Online Shopping.

Public transport in Melbourne options include bus, tram, and train. Undergraduate
students can apply for a concession pass that entitles them to discount travel. A
monthly concession ticket costs $54.80 for travel in Zone 1, $36.70 for Zone 2, and
$84.50 for Zones 1 and 2. The State Government has introduced a Myki smart
cared that is being rolled out across the transport system. Universities in the city
centre generally don't offer student parking, and private parking can be expensive.
Those further out in the suburbs often have free car parks or sell yearly parking
permits.  

The first few weeks in Melbourne may be expensive due to the one-off expenses.
These may include temporary accommodation, rental bonds, books, clothing,
furnishings, etc. Other major expenditure may include purchasing and maintaining
a car, and obtaining a driver’s licence.

For Australian dollars to dollar conversion, click here.




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